Radio engineering time travel - 1922

Radio engineering time travel (1922)

I invite you to look at the "pictures" related to radio technology. They come from various sources. The gallery has its sister version in Polish and Russian. Versions in other languages will be added successively. More detailed descriptions can be found in other language versions (articles are related and can be displayed by clicking on the icons with flags on the left, top of the TRIODA website). Of course, I will complement translations of signatures quite slowly. All descriptions are displayed using the present tense and not the past - this is not a mistake only deliberate action - a reference to the original descriptions from those years. In order not to delay the possibility of viewing the gallery, this site is made available as a "site under construction" - for which I apologize to all guests. At the beginning and end of each set of photographs there are links allowing to change the period - calendar year.

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The fascination of Radio is entering the home. The photograph above shows a home in the San Francisco Bay Region enjoying a Radio musical concert received with de Forest standard equipment and reproduced by the Radio Magnavox. A -P Tubes are used in the de Forest combination transmitting and receiving set and in the Magnavox Power Amplifier shown. Over the Radiophone, the daughter of the home is telling the soloist at the de Forest broadcasting station, many miles away, how much the family is enjoying the concert.
(Radio for January, 1922)

 
A-P Opens Pacific Radio Convention
Photograph shows Club Officials, Radio Officers and members of the A -P staff receiving the opening address by radio with A -P tubes used in de Forest inter-panel equipment and Magnavox amplifying and loud speaking apparatus. "The tubes that are used by those who know."
(Radio for February, 1922)

 
Throughout the length and breadth of the land, thousands of famil ies are listening to music. concerts, news of the day, lectures, weather reports, church services, etc.. right in their own homes with a $15.00 "Marvel" Radio Telephone Receiving Outfit. No longer is it necessary to have expensive apparatus or any knowledge or experience in wireless telegraphy.
(Radio for February, 1922)

 
9AMB
Due to his consistent work and great range, thousands of operators have heard 9AMB and will be interested in a brief account of this station, which belongs to D. L. Hathaway, 1575 Pennsylvania St., Denver, Colorado, and is operated by J. L. Hathaway.
(Radio for February, 1922)

 
Receiving Equipment at Pacific Radio School
The student about to take a course in radio wants to be assured that he will secure maximum proficiency in minimum time. This assurance is given by the Pacific Radio School, an old- established institution in the Call Building, San Francisco. This claim is substantiated by personal instruction from practical operators and the opportunity to actually use the latest types of equipment. The instructors are Mr. A. S. McKenzie, who is in charge of the school, and Mr. R. H. Pray, a former U. S. Shipping Board operator and one of the leading mid -West amateurs. Mr. McKenzie was recently presented with a handsome pair of binoculars by his students, as a token of their appreciation of the beneficial instruction received under his direction. The transmitting equipment includes a complete 2 -k.w. arc set with combined ignition key and shunt system, an Independent Company tranmitter, a Kilbourne & Clarke impulse transmitter, an old type United Wireless set, and a Clapp Eastham transmitter.
There are also five complete receiving sets, including a Kennedy Universal set and a Navy Standard Type 1420. For practice the students copy East Coast signals by means of forty phones in parallel. This school is one of the few Pacific Coast stations that heard the Clement test from New York. This is claimed to be the only radio school in the country equipped with a Kleinschmidt electric perforator and two automatic cable transmitters. The instructors perforate a complete reel of tape every morning for the day's work. This is run at an average speed of thirty words a minute for one and a half hours. It is capable of running at any speed up to 400 words a minute. The students' receiving record is thirty -eight words. A thorough grounding in experimental electricity is given with Swoope's "Practical Electricity" as the basis. In addition to complete apparatus for the experiments in this text, there is a Kolster decremeter, of which the students make daily use, a Tesla transformer, an audibility meter, galvanometer and other meters. The school has run at its full capacity of forty students during the past year.
(Radio for February, 1922)


Complete 10 Watt C. W. Transmitter Operating on Pre_rectified A.C.
(Radio for May, 1922)


The Radio Store of Paul F. Johnson
(Radio for June, 1922)

 
Radio Room in "Majestic," the World's Biggest Ship, Showing Tube Transmitter at Left Center and Spark Transmitter at Right Center. Radio Compass is Shown at Extreme Left.
(Radio for July, 1922)

 
 Signal Corps Continuous Wave Station Twenty Miles West of Paris After the Armistice to Communicate With Spa, Coblenz, Treves, Antwerp and American General Headquarters Replacing Telegraph Lines Which Were Turned Over to French. As High as Eight Thousand Words Were Handled by This Station in a Day. Note the Loop for Reception to Eliminate Interference.
(Radio for August, 1922)


American Direction Finder Near Front Lines Day Previous to St. Mihiel Attack by American Troops. These Stations Were Located About Five Miles in Rear Front Lines and Twelve Miles Apart. The Hut and Loop Are Camouflaged in Order That the German Aviators Cannot Locate the Station. Loop Used is Ten Feet Square. 
(Radio for August, 1922)


Interior of Station Near Paris. Portable Radio Huts Were Used by the Signal Corps in France.
(Radio for August, 1922)

 
Pacentized Equipment used by Major Armstrong to demonstrate his super-regenerative circuit before the Institute of Radio Engineers
(Radio for August, 1922)

 
Altissimo Receiving and Loud Speaking Outfit - The Radio Store Pasadena, California, 562 East Colorado Street,
(Radio for August, 1922)


 A modern shipboard arc set. With this set, which has an antenna less than thirty feet above the transmitter, communication recently was maintained with KFS (San Francisco) while off the Japan coast, or a distance of 1611 miles. (SS "Stockton ")
(Radio for September, 1922)


Raising wireless masts in Alaska is a cold job. Here the rigging gang are hard at it, sending up a topmast.
(Radio for September, 1922)

 
Back view of a three -tube super -regenerative receiver constructed by Mr. Harkness.
(Radio for September, 1922)


Graphic Placing of Jewell Instruments on Radiophone Hook-up
(Radio for October, 1922)


 PARAGON Radio Products
(Radio for October, 1922)

 
The BENWOOD Co. Inc. - View of St. Louis Retail Department,
(Radio for October, 1922)

 
Views of radio stations in the high Sierra Nevada Mountains of Fresno County, California, where orders will be received for the direction of 500 men who will be marooned next winter, working on the Southern California Edison Company's great electric waterpower development.
(Radio for November, 1922)

 
The elaborate radio room of a San Francisco -China greyhound. (U. S. Shipping Board "Lone Star State. ") From left to right are audion and transmitter storage battery switchboards, five kilowatt arc, arc control panel, tuner, audion detector, and two -step amplifier. The inset shows a half-kilowatt auxiliary spark transmitter, which the cameraman had to stand in front of to get the big picture.
(Radio for November, 1922)


 Radio 6XAD, Avalon, Catalina Island, California. Kennedy Long Wave Receiver, Grebe 2 -Step Amplifier and Western Electric Loud Speaker at Left. On the Main Operating Table are ICW Transmitter Using Two 50 -Watt Tubes Radiating 6.1 Amp. on 240 meters, Grebe CRS with Special Western Electric 2 -Step Amplifier, CW Transmitter Using Four 50 Watt Tubes Radiating 7 Amp. on 370 Meters, and ICW Transmitter with Four 5 Watt Tubes Radiating 2.9 Amp. or 220 Meters. At the Right is a Motor -Generator Set Delivering 1500 Volts dc to 200 Watt Transmitter.
(Radio for November, 1922)

 
Interior of KYDL, Showing Ira J. Karr as Operator.
(Radio for November, 1922)

 
Advertisement
(Radio for November, 1922)

 
The new A C Amplifier, to a considerable extent, increases the reception possibilities of the Aeriola Sr. With head telephones and the A C Amplifier reception ranges of one hundred to three hundred miles become possible for the owner of an Aeriola Sr., depending on local conditions. Used with the Vocarola loud -speaker, the Aetiola Sr. and A C Amplifier fill a whole room with music and speech received over distances of ten to thirty miles. Anybody can make the simple connections required, including mother and the girls.
(Radio for December, 1922)

 
2 K.W. Set on Tanker "Frank G. Drum"
(Radio for December, 1922)

 
Radio School Apparatus - Several correspondence school courses in wireless operating have been extensively advertised during the last few years.
(Radio for December, 1922)

 
500 Watt Western Electric Radio Telephone Equipment in the Wanamaker Broadcasting Station at Philadelphia, Pa., by Means of Which Music From the Wanamaker Grand Organ Ilas Been Heard at Berkeley, Calif., and San Juan, Porto Rico.
(Radio for December, 1922)

 
Los Angeles Radio Show
(Radio for December, 1922)


Exhibit al Los Angeles Radio Show. The Koster Decremeter on Center Showcase Is Available for Amateur or Commercial Testing Purposes.
(Radio for December, 1922)

 
PARAGON Radio Products
(Radio for December, 1922)


 General View of KPH Receiving Station at Marshall, California
(Radio for January, 1923)

 
Listening -In at KPH
(Radio for January, 1923)


Transmitting Antenna System at Bolinas
(Radio for January, 1923)

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